Prairie Talks is a speaker series that connects people and ideas. No matter your interests, you’ll find these talks engaging, challenging, and just the thing to stretch your mind. Come on your own or as a family, everyone is welcome. Talks are free of charge, but donations are welcome to help defray expenses. Please visit our Facebook page for more information. 

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Sunday, July 14, 2019
Prairie Village Museum
Rugby, North Dakota

In case you missed seeing Mark Twain the last time he was in North Dakota (it was, after all, in July of 1895), you can catch him this July when he will be here again.  George Frein will portray author Mark Twain in a Chautauqua-style presentation, “Mark Twain on Humor” which will feature Twain’s ideas about humor as well as some of his practice of it.

According to Frein, “Mr. Twain says that he well remembers his last visit to North Dakota and is eager to return to see if North Dakotans are as ready to laugh now as they were then. When asked why he wanted to talk about humor, he said, “Because humor is mankind’s greatest blessing.”

As Mark Twain, Frein will talk about the profession and practice of humor. Audience members are encouraged tolisten with what Samuel Coleridge called “a willing suspension of disbelief.” Following the monologue, audience members will have a chance to ask Twain questions and express their own opinions about humor. And in the third part of the program, Frein will offer insight and answer questions as a Twain expert and scholar.

Frein, who taught in the University of North Dakota department of Philosophy and Religion for 29 years, developed his first Chautauqua presentation in 1986. In addition to Twain, Frein has several historical characters in his repertoire, including historian Henry Adams, novelist Herman Melville, and German author Erich Maria Remarque, whom he portrayed in a Prairie Talks presentation last fall. Frein lives in Fort Worth, Texas, with his wife, Shelly Matthews.

“I am glad to return to Twain’s humor and to Rugby,” Frein said.

Sponsored in part by Humanities North Dakota
Co-sponsored by Prairie Village Museum